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Erectile Dysfunction Articles

AEROBIC EXCERCISES FOR (ED) TREATMENT

Working the muscles beyond the pelvic floor may also help combat erectile dysfunction. A study published in The American Journal of Cardiology indicates that aerobic exercise may help improve ED.ED is often caused by blood flow problems to the penis. Obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, and vascular disease can affect blood flow and result in ED. Adding aerobic exercise to your routine can improve your overall health and may lead to improvements in ED.Even brisk walking 30 minutes a day, three to four times a week, may be enough to change your cardiovascular health and impact your ED.

 

BASIC KIEGEL EXCERCISE

The best method for locating the muscles of the pelvic floor (the lower pelvis) is to stop your stream several times in the middle of urination. The muscles you clench to do this are the ones you need to exercise. To perform a rep of Kegel exercises, squeeze those muscles, hold for five seconds, then relax. Repeat this 10 to 20 times, two or three times a day. You may want to try this in different positions, including lying down with your knees up, sitting in a chair, and standing.You probably won’t be able to finish a complete series of 10 Kegels when you first try. That’s fine. Do what you can, and eventually work up to 10 to 20 Kegels, three times a day.

Don’t hold your breath or push with your stomach, buttocks, or thigh muscles. Remember to relax after each count of five. Alternate between short and long squeezes to challenge yourself.Another way to think about Kegels is to squeeze the muscles of your anus, like you are holding a bowel movement. Hold for 5 to 10 seconds while breathing, then relax all muscles.Pelvic floor exercises help to relieve erectile dysfunction.

They can also help:

  1. Stop Dribble after urination
  2. improve overall sexual experience

WHAT IS ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION (ED)

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is defined as the persistent inability to achieve or maintain an erection adequate for satisfactory sexual activity. After premature ejaculation, it is the most common disorder of sexual function in men, affecting nearly 30 million individuals in the United Kingdom. Despite this startling prevalence and the undisputed impact that erectile function has on a man’s self-esteem and quality of life, ED remained largely an under-diagnosed disorder until the recent availability of an effective oral therapy. Care of ED has moved into the realm of the primary care physician and those who care for patients at risk for loss of erectile function, such as cardiologists, psychiatrists, and endocrinologists.